simple

challah french toast by Nate Everett

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You can probably tell that I'm a big fan of pan-fried batter and maple syrup. With fresh berries and butter, of course. It doesn't get much better than this. Waffles and pancakes are recurring posts on my Insta feed, and I would be remiss if I left out French toast. 

French toast originated in medieval Europe. While the clergy and nobles feasted on suckling pig and boar sausage, the less fortunate peasants were left to their own devices. Bread, of course, was a staple of the peasant class. Soaking stale bread in a mixture of milk and egg and frying the bread in a cast iron pan was a surefire way to salvage an ailing food. Hence the birth of pain perdu, or "lost bread" in French. It is one of the many famous dishes born out of hardship. 

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Many centuries later, French toast is a customer favorite on brunch menus across America, and it's incredibly easy to make at home with ingredients that you've probably got on hand. Pillowy challah bread is one of the best breads (I imagine brioche is great as well!) for French toast because it sops up more of the milk/egg/spice mixture than, say, a slice of Pepperidge Farm allows. 

Styling sidebar: For this photoshoot, I swapped out my dark wood surfaces for white and concrete. I did this for a couple of reasons. First, I wanted the apothecary jars to pop, as they would've been lost against a walnut surface. The second reason was that I wanted to convey a frosty, wintery aesthetic. This winter, I will definitely stick with my standard moody photos, but I like the idea of throwing in some soft white surfaces as well. It's different. What do you guys think? Would you like to see more of this monochromatic grey/white look? I'd love to hear your thoughts in the comments section!

recipe 

  • 6 large brown eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 1 tsp grated lemon zest
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • 2 dashes nutmeg
  • 2 dashes ground ginger
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp maple syrup
  • 1 loaf challah bread
  • Unsalted butter
  • Vegetable oil
  1. Preheat the oven to 250°F.
  2. Beat the eggs in a large mixing bowl. Add the milk, lemon zest, cinnamon, brown sugar, salt, nutmeg, ground ginger, vanilla extract and maple syrup. Whisk together until homogenized.
  3. Slice the bread into one-inch thick slices. Soak each slice in the mixture for two minutes on each side. Try to fit in as many slices as you can without overcrowding the bowl.
  4. Put one tablespoon each of butter and vegetable oil in a large nonstick skillet and heat over medium-high. Stir quickly with a spatula to combine. Once the butter has melted, add the soaked bread. Cook each slice for 2 to 3 minutes on each side until golden brown on both sides. Transfer to a cookie sheet and keep warm in the oven. Repeat the frying process with the remaining slices, adding more butter and oil to the pan as needed.
  5. Serve warm and top with butter, powdered sugar, berries and maple syrup. Eat and repeat. Enjoy!

If you make this recipe, hashtag a pic to #spiceandhutch and post to Instagram, Facebook and/or Twitter. I'd love to see your culinary creations!

Adapted from Ina Garten

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pumpkin chocolate chip muffins by Nate Everett

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The fall series continues. It was a brisk and overcast week here in DC - an ideal setting for baking. Autumn would be incomplete without feasting on my favorite baked good of the season: pumpkin chocolate chip muffins. Warm dollops of sugary goodness with a perfect balance of pumpkin and spice.

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I'm pleased to share my mother's legendary recipe with you, as I have enjoyed these muffins for as long as I can remember. When I bake them again this fall, I'm going to transform them into cupcakes by piping on a pumpkin-flavored cream cheese frosting. Pumpkin in its best possible form.

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This recipe yields two dozen muffins. A note, when the muffins have finished baking, check for doneness by plunging a toothpick into one of the muffins. There is a very good chance that your toothpick will pierce a melty chocolate chip instead of the batter, thus you will likely need to test several areas of a muffin to check if the batter has baked completely. If the toothpick comes out clean, then they are done baking; if the toothpick is coated with batter, then bake the muffins for about five minutes longer.

recipe

  • 1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 tbsp ground ginger
  • 1 tbsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp allspice
  • 2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 pound plain pumpkin puree
  • 2 sticks butter, melted & cooled to room temperature
  • 2 cups semi-sweet chocolate chips
  1. Place an oven rack in the middle part of the oven and preheat to 375°F. Line two muffin pans with baking cups.
  2. Measure out the dry ingredients and put them in a large mixing bowl. Whisk together until combined.
  3. Melt the butter in a saucepan or the microwave. Allow to cool to room temperature before proceeding.
  4. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs until homogenized.
  5. Add the butter, eggs, and pumpkin puree to the dry ingredients. Stir together thoroughly until the ingredients are well-combined, then fold in the chocolate chips.
  6. Scoop the batter into the baking cups. Fill each cup to the brim. 
  7. Put the muffin pans in the oven and bake for 30-35 minutes at 375°F. See note above about checking for doneness. When the muffins have finished baking, allow them to cool for 15 minutes before unmolding onto a baking rack.

If you make this recipe, hashtag a pic to #spiceandhutch and post to Instagram, Facebook and/or Twitter. I'd love to see your culinary creations!

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